As discussed last week typography is very important in design and there are many different factors and elements in the world of typography. A       little recap: we established that font and typefaces are different and we explored some different types of fonts such as Serif, San serif, and display fonts.

   In this week’s blog, we are going to discuss the elements of typography.

   Danielle Hill (2013) said it best. She said “Typography is 95 percent of design- it’s a driving force in all forms of communication art. Can you   imagine reading read a magazine, checking out a website, playing with an app or watching TV without text?”

   Typography is placed in two groups for better understanding. The groups are readability and personality.

   According to Runyu Xia (2018) readability refers to multiple aspects, including font size, font type, font weight, font color, leading and tracking.   The key factor to improve readability is building a clear hierarchy, which means creating a strong contrast.

   Personality is more about the visual look of the font. Everything needs to fit well with each other to keep the whole style consistent. It also includes the alignment of the text.

   We have already discussed typeface in the previous blog as well as font size, its type, weight, and color. We will continue our discussion with hierarchy.

   A forward definition of hierarchy is “a system in which members of an organization or society are ranked according to relative status or authority.”   Simply put, it is arranging in order of importance. This is very important in typography because it enables the consumer to see what the most important thing is in your design. The most important information should be the biggest and the most appealing thing on the page so that the consumer looks at it first and then move on to the other information.

   Another element is Leading or Line Spacing. This is the amount of space between lines. If the spacing is too small or too far apart it makes reading a challenge and is exhausting on the eyes. Below is an example of bad line spacing.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, eum ad dicunt senserit disputando. Saepe sententiae at vix, ne vel dictas posidonium. Pro id sumo dicat similique, nibh suavitate sea ex, eruditi appellantur pri ut. Ea vim nominati reprehendunt.

Ferri graecis consetetur qui no. Zril laudem eum te, et inani impedit scaevola vim. Cu est meis accusam, has id fabulas maiorum mnesarchum, nam vero eripuit eu. Ea dolor fierent partiendo has. Ea eos dicam hendrerit voluptaria, prompta rationibus at nec.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, eum ad dicunt senserit disputando. Saepe sententiae at vix, ne vel dictas posidonium. Pro id sumo dicat similique, nibh suavitate sea ex, eruditi appellantur pri ut. Ea vim nominati reprehendunt.

Ferri graecis consetetur qui no. Zril laudem eum te, et inani impedit scaevola vim. Cu est meis accusam, has id fabulas maiorum mnesarchum, nam vero eripuit eu. Ea dolor fierent partiendo has. Ea eos dicam hendrerit voluptaria, prompta rationibus at nec.

   It is rather exhausting to read both correct? This is why spacing is so crucial to design. The default is usually perfect but if you want more space just be mindful of readers’ reaction.

   Many people who are new to the world of design may think Leading and Tracking is the same thing but it is not. While leading focuses on the space between lines, tracking is the space between letters. Normally, the default is best. Again as a designer if you are going to change the space between letters ensure that it will have a positive impact on the readers.

   Contrast is another element in typography. As the name suggests, it is being different from each other. The awesome thing about being different is that in typography if used correctly will produce great work. Martin (2017) said: “Contrast makes text interesting and can help you communicate which ideas you want to emphasize. Varying size, typeface, weight, color, and style can give your designs a big impact as well as make your ideas organized. Play around with contrasting colors and typefaces. You will be surprised by the great work that can come.

Consistency is one of the elements that are directed to the reader. It refers to how uniform the design is. Even though, as a designer, there are many colors, typefaces, and fonts that can be utilized, having too many, creates confusion in a design. For example: If you have a blue color background on your design and you use grey color typeface, it may be difficult to see, which makes the design ineffective. As a designer, nothing is wrong with playing around with colors, typefaces, and fonts; however, ensure that whatever you use must complement each other and be effective in communicating your message.

Alignment is very similar to consistency as both embody the personality of your design. Martin (2017) said “Alignment refers to the ‘line,’ which the text orients towards. It can apply to a whole body of text, individual words, or even images. Alignment should be as consistent as possible and every element of your design is meant to align to one of the other elements in some way, to create equal sizes and distances between objects.” There are left, right, center and justify alignments. Left and right alignment give your design a more appealing look and sophisticated feel. This is not saying they should be utilized at all times. Again, playing around with different ways of doing design, gives more understanding of what compliments each other and what does not.

These are some of the elements used in Typography. Next week we will speak about why Typography is important.

 

References

Martin. L (2017) Elements everyone needs to understand

Retrieved from: https://medium.com/gravitdesigner/typography-elements-everyone-needs-to-understand-5fdea82f470d

Xia. R (2018) What should a new designer know about Typography

Retrieved from: https://medium.muz.li/what-should-a-new-designer-know-about-typography-24bc56f4ba8

Beginning Graphic Design-Typography

Retrieved from: https://edu.gcfglobal.org/en/beginning-graphic-design/typography/1/